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Descendants of Isaac WINSTON

Seventh Generation

96. Isaac N. WINSTON (Isaac ? , John , James , William (James or John) , William , Isaac ) was born in 1822 in Tennessee. He died on 8 Feb 1884.

Source: LDS web site

1850 census
Isaac N Winston Valley, Rutherford, TN abt 1823 Tennessee
Mahaly Winston Valley, Rutherford, TN abt 1827 Tennessee
Jerome Winston Valley, Rutherford, TN abt 1848 Tennessee
William Winston Valley, Rutherford, TN abt 1849 Tennessee
Joseph Winston Valley, Rutherford, TN abt 1831 Tennessee

Isaac married Mahaly. Mahaly was born about 1827 in Tennessee.

They had the following children:

  129 M i Jerome WINSTON was born about 1848 in Tennessee.
  130 M ii William WINSTON was born about 1849 in Tennessee.

101. Joseph COOK (Hannah ? WINSTON , William , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ).

Email for researcher:
I believe that you have misplaced Captain John Cooke of Franklin Co. NC who was the son of Shem and Ann Rucker Cooke. This JOhn Cooke married Hannah Winston, d/o William Winston Sr. Joseph Cooke was their son and possibly married his cousin, Gilly Winston. I have much information on this family of Cookes.

Gilly Winston found in:
Marriage Index: MD, NC, VA, 1624-1915
Spouse: Joseph, Cook Marriage Date: Dec 5, 1826 Location: Franklin, North Carolina

Joseph married Gilly WINSTON on 5 Dec 1826 in Franklin, North Carolina.

They had the following children:

  131 F i Mary Frances COOK was born on 9 Apr 1829 in Franklin, NC. She died on 21 Oct 1913 in Wilson Co, NC .

Marriage 1 Dr. Robert Lee Paschall b: 8 NOV 1830 in Louisburg, Granville County, North Carolina
Married: 14 DEC 1852 in Franklin County, North Carolina
Children
Robert Albirtus Paschall b: 21 NOV 1853 in Wayne County, North Carolina
Joseph Branch Paschall b: 7 MAY 1855 in Wayne County, North Carolina
Joshua Walter Paschall b: 22 SEP 1857 in Wayne County, North Carolina
Benjamin Greene Paschall b: 30 JAN 1859 in Wayne County, North Carolina
Henrietta Paschall b: 2 MAY 1861 in Wayne County, North Carolina

104. Dorothy "Dolly" (Todd) PAYNE (Mary ? COLES , Mary Ann WINSTON , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born on 20 May 1767/1772 in North Carolina. She died on 12 Jul 1849 in Washington, D.C..

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VII M. Madison, George page 214 MADISON, Dorothy (Payne) Todd, wife of President Madison, was born in North Carolina, May 20, 1767; daughter of John and Mary (Coles) Payne and granddaughter of John and Hannah (Fleming) Payne, and of William Coles of Coles Hill, Va. Her paternal grandfather emigrated from England to Virginia early in the 18th century and her paternal grandmother was a granddaughter of Sir Thomas Fleming, one of the pioneer settlers of Jamestown. Her parents removed to Philadelphia while Dorothy was a child and joined the Society of Friends, in which faith she was reared. She was married in 1786 to John Todd, a young lawyer of Philadelpbia, Pa., who died in 1789 leaviag her with an infant son. She made her home with her widowed mother in Philadelphia and assisted her in keeping a boarding house. She was married secondly in 1794 to James Madison, one of her mother's boarders, in attendance as representative from Virginia in the 3d congress. The ceremony was performed at "Harewood," Jefferson county, Va., the home of her younger sister Lucy, the wife of George Steptoe Washington. They resided at "Montpelier," Mr. Madison's summer home, until 1809 when he was appointed secretary of state and they removed to Washington, D.C. Mrs. Madison became the centre of Washington's social circle, and upon the elevation of her husband as President of the Ucited States, she filled the position of mistress of the White House brilliantly and successfully. In 1814 the British army marched against the national capital and the President and his cabinet fled to Virginia, but Mrs. Madison remained at the White House where she packed many important cabinet papers into trunks which were put into a carriage, and as an afterthought she removed Stuart's portrait of Washington from its frame and saw it in a place of safety before leaving. She was rejoined by Mr. Madison in Washington and together they fled to Virginia.[p.214] A few days later she returned to Washington, where she found her home in ashes. The President followed the next day and they rented the house called the "Octagon" owned by Colonel Taylor, where they resided until the White House was rebuilt. In 1817, upon the expiration of President Madison's second term, they returned to Montpelier, where she lived in retirement. Congress conferred on her the franking privilege and voted her a seat upon the floor of the senate. She removed to Washington one year after her husband's death and again entered society. She died in Washington, D.C., July 12, 1849.


September, 1794, they were married at "Harewood," Jefferson County, W, Va., the country residence of Mr. Samuel Washington (brother of Gen'l George Washington), whose son had married Anna Payne, the fifteen-year-old sister of the bride. Mrs. Madison was born in North Carolina on May 20, 1772, and was daughter of John Payne and Mary, née Coles, a first cousin of Patrick Henry and a granddaughter of John Payne, Quaker, and Ann, née Flemming, who in her turn was granddaughter of Sir Thomas Flemming (1616), second son of the Earl of Wigton. Miss Keys, of Baltimore writes of her, "The name of Dolly Madison bears with it a subtle charm. Of all the noble women who have graced the White House with their presence in the nineteenth century, none has left behind her a more charming and attractive memory than Dolly Madison." It is said of President Madison, "that his biography and writings are an integral part of our national literature;"
Image Not Shown
Mrs. Dorothea Todd Madison, née Payne it might be said with equal truth of the delightful Dolly, that her letters, and the traditions of her give us an insight into the social life of the best society of that day, that we could ill afford to lose. She came of Quaker stock and was reared amidst the severe and formal environments that sect think right to impose on all that belong to them, be they old or young. In dress Dolly was an artist, yet it is not difficult to imagine how demure and 'fetching' she looked in the quaintly becoming dress of a young Quakeress.
Volume IV
Chapter XIII Hite, Madison, Fontaine and Maury Families.
Bible Record.

Other Source: Virginia, Prominent Families, Vol. 1-4

Dorothy married (1) John TODD in 1786. John died in 1789.

They had the following children:

  132 M i Son TODD.

Dorothy married (2) President James MADISON son of Col. James MADISON and Eleanor Rose CONWAY in 1794. President was born on 16 Mar 1751 in Port Conway, King George county, Va. He died on 28 Jun 1826 in Montpelier, Va.

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VII M. Madison, James page 216217218 MADISON, James, fourth president of the United States, was born in Port Conway, King George county, Va., March 16, 1751; son of Col. James and Eleanor Rose (Conway) Madison; grandson of Ambrose and Frances (Taylor) Madison; great grandson of John and Agatha (Strother) Madison, and of James and Martha (Thompson) Taylor, and great2 grandson of Capt. John Madison, who was a patentee of a tract of land between the York and North rivers on Chesapeake bay in Virginia in 1653. Captain John's son, John, settled in Orange county, and built the homestead at Montpelier, where his son Ambrose was born, and on reaching manhood took to his house as his wife Frances, daughter of James and Martha (Thompson) Taylor, of Port Conway, King George county. Col. James Madison, born March 27, 1723, was a prosperous but not wealthy farmer, and James, the eldest of the twelve children, was sent to school to Donald Robertson near Montpelier, and was prepared for college by the Rev. Thomas Martin, the minister of the parish. When seventeen years old he was matriculated at the College of New Jersey, Princeton, and he gave close attention to his studies, allowing himself for long periods but three hours' sleep out of the twenty-four. In this way he completed a four-years' course in three years, but on commencement day, Sept. 25, 1771, the program announced that "Mr. James Madison was excused from taking part in the exercises," as he had so overworked as to lead to a complete collapse. His standing in his studies was high and he received his diploma with the class of 1771, the document being dated October 7. This diploma came to light in 1898, when the treasures of the Congressional library were being transferred to the new building. He remained in Princeton after his graduation, taking a post graduate course in Hebrew under President Witherspoon, 1771-79. He then tutored in his father's family, and as his health would allow, continued his study of history, constitutional law and theology. He served as a member of the committee of safety from Orange county in 1774, when twenty-three years old, and was a delegate to the state convention held at Williamsburg in May, 1776. This convention instructed the Virginia delegates to advocate a declaration of independence, and afterward framed a constitution for the state. Madison was a member of the special committee on the constitution and the author of the clause in the bill of rights as adopted, declaring "all men equally entitled to the free exercise of religion according to the dictates of conscience." He was a representative from Orange in the first state legislature, but failed of election to the second as he would not solicit votes or furnish refreshments to voters. He was unanimously elected by the legislature a member of the state council, and in 1780 was chosen a delegate to the Continental congress. On taking his seat at Philadelphia he was at once recognized as a leader and was made a member of important committees. He opposed the issue of paper money proposed treaties with France and Spain, espe-[sic] by the states; was chairman of the committee on foreign relations, and was entrusted to draw up the instructions to John Jay in reference to [sic]cially locking to an alliance with Spain in order to obtain military assistance in view of the success of the British army in the southern states. Virginia at first sustained him in opposing any surrender of the free use of the Mississippi river, but subsequently favored the surrender of the Mississippi valley to Spain in consideration of an offensive and defensive alliance. This policy Madison continued to oppose, but he finally consented to embody the offer in the instructions to Mr. Jay under protest. Fortunately the surrender of Cornwallis enabled him to countermand these instructions and he was rewarded for his diplomacy by seeing the Mississippi valley the heart of the American republic. He strenuously advocated a limited impost law and in 1783 was made chairman of the committee on ways and means where he antagonized his constituents and disregarded the instructions of the legislature of Virginia which had revoked their former action by which they had assented to an impost law. The adoption of this law called for the first compromise made between the slave and free states, and was proposed and carried through by Madison as the only way in which to secure a continuance of the union. In this agreement it was stipulated that slaves should be rated as population, five slaves to count as three persons. He was a representative in the state legislature, 1784-86, and took an active part in revising the statutes of Virginia and abolishing the Federal system of entails, primogeniture and state support to the Anglican church. During this time he wrote his celebrated "Memorial and Remonstrance" on the latter subject, classed as one of [p.216] his ablest state papers. He represented Virginia in the Annapolis meeting of September, 1786, which called a national constitutional convention at Philadelphia. He was a delegate to the Continental congress, 1786-88. In the convention which met in May, 1787, to frame the Federal constitution, he was a member of the committee and a chief pioneer of the "Virginia Plan," which resulted in the instrument as adopted. He also advocated its adoption through the columns of the Federalist, which was the joint mouthpiece of Hamilton, Jay and Madison. He returned to Virginia in March, 1788, to take part in the state convention called to ratify the Federal constitution, where he found Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, George Mason, James Monroe, Benjamin Harrison and John Tyler opposed to the instrument. Madison assumed the leadership of the party in favor of its adoption and was supported in its advocacy by Marshall, Wythe, Randolph, Pendleton and Henry Lee, and the constitution was ratified by Virginia, the vote standing 89 to 79,—so close a vote that the succeeding state assembly called upon congress for a national convention to reconsider the action of the first convention. Henry opposed Madison as U.S. senator and succeeded in keeping his name out of the contest. Madison was, however, elected a representative from Virginia in the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th congresses, 1789-97. In congress he opposed the policy of Hamilton in relation to the finances, but was not at first classed as a radical Republican. He was married in Virginia, in 1794, to Dorothy (Payne) Todd, widow of John Todd, and daughter of John and Mary (Coles) Payne of North Carolina. President Washington offered Mr. Madison the mission to France in 1794, which he declined, as he also did the portfolio of state the same year. He had meanwhile become the acknowledged leader of the Republican party, and his opposition to the policy of the administration made him the choice of that party for the presidency in 1796, but he declined to be a candidate and advocated the election of Thomas Jefferson. During Adams's administration he retired to Montpelier and took no part in the affairs of state except to express his opinion in letters to the public press. He was the author of the "Resolutions of 1789," in condemnation of the alien and sedition laws, which resolutions were adopted by the Virginia legislature, and of the report on the resolutions of 1798 in 1800. in which he defended the resolutions. He was again elected to represent Orange county in the Virginia assembly in 1799, and in 1800 was an elector from Virginia to vote for Thomas Jefferson for President. His writings at this time paved the way for the inauguration of a Republican administration and when Jefferson was elected he naturally turned to Madison as his chief cabinet officer. On March 4, 1801, Madison took up the portfolio of state and for eight years directed foreign affairs. In 1809 he was elected President of the United States, the electoral vote standing: for President, James Madison of Virginia, Republican, 122, Charles C. Pinekney of South Carolina, Federalist, 47, George Clinton of New York, Republican, 6; for Vice-President, George Clinton of New York, Republican, 113, Rufus King of New York, Federalist, 47, John Langdon of New Hampshire, 9, James Madison, 3, James Monroe, 3. In making up his cabinet President Madison appointed Robert Smith of Maryland, Jefferson's secretary of the navy and attorney-general, as secretary of state; Albert Gallatin of Pennsylvania secretary of the treasury, which office he had also held under Jefferson; William Eustis of Massachusetts, secretary of war; and Paul Hamilton of South Carolina, secretary of the navy. The following changes occurred in the cabinet during Madison's two administrations: James Monroe of Virginia succeeded Secretary Smith in the state department, April 2, 1811; Secretary of the Treasury Gallatin resigned, and on Feb. 9, 1814, was succeeded by George W. Campbell of Tennessee, after whose resignation in September, 1814, Alexander J. Dallas of Pennsylvania was appointed, Oct. 6. 1814, and was in turn succeeded by William H. Crawford of Georgia, Oct. 22, 1816; in the war department the successors of Secretary Eustis were John Armstrong of New York, appointed January 15, 1813; James Monroe of Virginia, Sept. 27, 1814; Alexander J. Dallas of Pennsylvania (acting) March 14, 1815, and William H. Crawford of Georgia, Aug. 1, 1815; and in the navy department Secretary Hamilton was succeeded, Jan. 12, 1813, by William Jones of Pennsylvania, who was succeeded by Benjamin was Crownshield of Massachusetts, Dec. 19, 1814. The war between France and England affected American commerce; American seamen were impressed in the foreign service, and American vessels trading with France were searched and detained by British men-of-war. [p.217] Negotiations with the offending nations failed to secure immunity, and acts of congress brought neither belligerent to terms. The war spirit was rife in the south and west and the continuation of diplomatic quarrels with Great Britain resulted in the declaration of war, June 18, 1812. The debate attending the passage was not made public at the time. In the house the vote stood 79 for war and 49 against, and in the senate 19 for and 18 against. In both houses about one-fourth of the Republican members voted with the Federalists against the declaration of war, and in the senate it is claimed that the three senators who turned the scale were Federalists who voted for the measure in order to embarrass the President. Pennsylvania was the only northern state voting for war, and Kentucky the only southern state voting against the measure. The President had ample cause to recommend the action to congress and the same cause equally affected the attitude of the United States toward France, but the friendship of that nation during the Revolution made her offence less serious in the opinion of the congress. The officers and soldiers in the army were largely drawn from the northwest and the U.S. navy was drawn from the northeast. In November, 1812, Madison was re-elected to the presidency. The electoral vote for President stood: for James Madison, 128, for DeWitt Clinton of New York, Federalist, 89; the vote for Vice-President was for Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts, Republican, 181, Jared Ingersoll of Pennsylvania, Federalist, 86. The war of 1812 was vigorously carried on for three years and in the northwest and in Canada the U.S. army met with successive victories and defeats. This indecisive warfare was followed by the capture of the national capital, the driving out of the President and his family from the White House; the burning of the capitol building and congressional library and the sacking of the executive mansion in August, 1814. These disasters were offset by a succession of victories at sea and on the lakes by the U.S. navy, resulting in the treaty of peace at Ghent, Dec. 24, 1814, after which on Jan. 8, 1815, General Jackson gained his signal victory over the British army at New Orleans. The hope of the young Republicans of the western states led by Henry Clay, to acquire the territory of Canada by right of conquest was the greatest incentive that led the twelfth congress to declare war, but their plans were not embodied in the treaty of peace which they reluctantly accepted. It was thought by many that their hopes would have been realized had the treaty been drawn up and signed after the battle of New Orleans, which gave to their section some of the glory gained in the war. The chief credit, however, went to the navy, and in the President's message to congress, Dec. 5, 1815, he said, speaking of the late war: "The signal services which have been rendered by our navy and the capacities it has developed for successful co-operation in the national defence will give to that portion of the public force its full value in the eyes of congress. To preserve the ships we now have in a sound state, to complete those already contemplated, to provide amply for prompt augmentations, is dictated by the soundest policy." Upon the close of his second term, after welcoming James Monroe, his friend and secretary of state, as his successor, Mr. Madison retired to Montpelier, where for nearly twenty years he lived a quiet, uneventful life. He succeeded Jefferson as rector of the University of Virginia, and served the institution as rector and visitor. He was also a visitor of the College of William and Mary. He was a delegate to the Virginia constitutional convention of 1829, but was too infirm to take part in the active work of the convention. The College of New Jersey and the College of William and Mary conferred on him the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1787. Besides twenty-six of the papers contributed to the Federalist in defence of the constitution of the United States, and the Memorial and Remonstrance against taxing the people of Virginia for the support of teachers of the Christian religion, published as "Madison's Religious Freedom Act," translated into French and Italian, and extensively read in America and Europe, Mr. Madison is the author of: The Virginia Plan (1798); An Examination of the British Doctrine which subjects to Capture a Neutral Trade not open in the Time of Peace, prepared while secretary of state in Jefferson's administration; Report of the Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787, which is accepted as a political text-book of great value, and Advice to my Country, the lesson of his life as he wished his countrymen to understand it, which he desired should not be given to the public until after his death. In the last named book Madison says: "with regard to the responsibility of our country to mankind, let it be remembered that it has ever been the pride and boast of America that the rights for which she contended were the rights of human nature. By the blessing of the Author[p.218] of these rights on the means exerted for their defence, they have prevailed over all opposition…. No instance has heretofore occurred, nor can any instance be expected hereafter to occur in which the unadulterated forms of Republican government can pretend to so fair an opportunity of justifying themselves by their fruits. In this view the citizens of the United States are responsible for the greatest trust ever confided to a political society. If justice, good faith, honor, gratitude, and all the other qualities which ennoble the character of a nation and fulfil the ends of government, be the fruits of nut establishment, the cause of liberty will acquire a dignity and lustre which it has never yet enjoyed; and an example will be set which cannot but have the most favorable influence on the rights of mankind. If, on the other side, our government should be unfortunately blotted with the reverse of these cardinal and essential virtues, the great cause which we have engaged to vindicate will be dishonored and betrayed; the last and fairest experiment in favor of the rights of human nature will be turned against them; and their patrons and friends exposed to be insulted and silenced by the votaries of tyranny and usurpation." See "Reports of the Debates in the National Convention of 1787" (3 vols., 1840; new ed., 1 vol., 1893); "Madison's Complete Works" (6 vols.); "Life and Times of James Madison" by W. C. Rives (3 vols., 1859-69, unfinished); "The Letters and Other Writings of James Madison"(4 vols., 1865); "James Madison" by Sydney Howard Gay in "American Statesmen" series (1884); and "History of the United States under the Administration of James Madison," by Henry Adams (1893). In 1901 his grave at Montpelier was reached by crossing an uncultivated field to a dilapidated brick wall surrounding the family burial plot which was filled with sunken mounds, fallen headstones, and a wilderness of woods. One of these graves is that of James Madison, the "Father of the Constitution" and the fourth president of the United States. In selecting names for a place in the Hall of Fame for great Americans, New York university, October, 1900, James Madison in Class M. Rulers and Statesmen, received forty-eight votes, fifty-one being necessary to secure a place. President Madison died at Montpelier, Va., June 28, 1836.

108. Anthony Winston HUDDLESTON (Martha WINSTON , Anthony , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born about 1794 in Buckingham Co, Virginia. He died in 1849 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.

Source: LDS web site

1820 census
Anthony Huddleston Statesville,Wilson,TN 1820

1830 census
Gilbert Cook Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (110001-01001) age 30-40 - Image 25
Green Cook Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (021001-000011) age 30-40 - Image 152
Thomas Cook Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (0000001-000001001) age 40-50 - Image 164
Geo A Huddleson Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (010001-10001) age 30-40 - Image 90
Anthony Huddleston Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (111001-101001) age 30-40 - Image 112

1840 census
W W Huddleston Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee
A Hudleston Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee
P P Hudson Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee

1850 census
Anthony Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1794 Virginia
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1798 Tennessee
George Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1825 Tennessee
William Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1832 Tennessee

1860 census
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 68 1791 Virginia Female
William Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 26 1833 Tennessee Male

TENNESSEE MARRIAGES - Wilson County
1814, AUG 15 HUDDLESTON, A W marr. LEWIS, Elizabeth

Genealogical Records: Early Tennessee Settlers, 1700s-1900s
Listed in: Bible Records and Marriage Bonds
Page number: 451
Anthony W. Hudleston Elizabeth Lewis
Aug 18 1814 Lawrence Co, TN
Test. John Allcorn
By J. Winston J. P.

Anthony married Elizabeth ? LEWIS daughter of Charles ? LEWIS and Martha on 18 Aug 1814 in Wilson Co, Tennessee. Elizabeth was born about 1793/1798 in Tennessee. She died after 1870 in of Wilson Co, TN.

1860 census
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 68 1791 Virginia Female
William Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 26 1833 Tennessee Male

1870 census - District 17, Wilson, TN
William A. Huddleston, 36, TN, farmer
Mahaley, 28, TN
Thomas, 16, TN
William, 14, TN
Elizabeth, 12, TN
Julia A, 10, TN
Patrick, 8, TN
John M, 6, TN
Stonewall, 4, TN
Elizabeth, 70, VA

Anthony and Elizabeth had the following children:

+ 133 F i Martha E. HUDDLESTON
+ 134 M ii John L. HUDDLESTON
+ 135 M iii James M. HUDDLESTON
  136 M iv U. P. ? HUDDLESTON was born about 1822 in Tennessee.

1860 census
U P Huddleston District 23, Wilson, TN 36 1823 Tennessee Male
Elizabeth J Huddleston District 23, Wilson, TN 32 1827 Tennessee Female
        U. P. ? HUDDLESTON married Elizabeth J.. Elizabeth was born about 1827 in Tennessee.
+ 137 M v Marshall Woodson HUDDLESTON
+ 138 M vi George G. HUDDLESTON
  139 F vii Mary HUDDLESTON was born about 1828 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.
  140 M viii William A. HUDDLESTON was born in 1832 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.

1860 census
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 68 1791 Virginia Female
William Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 26 1833 Tennessee Male

1870 census - District 17, Wilson, TN
William A. Huddleston, 36, TN, farmer
Mahaley, 28, TN (widow of George G.)
Thomas, 16, TN
William, 14, TN
Elizabeth, 12, TN
Julia A, 10, TN
Patrick, 8, TN
John M, 6, TN
Stonewall, 4, TN
Elizabeth, 70, VA

1880 census
W. A. HUDDLESTON Self S Male W 45 TN Farmer VA VA
J. H. HUDDLESTON Nephew S Male W 23 TN Works On Farm TN TN
Bettie HUDDLESTON Niece S Female W 22 TN House Keeper TN TN
J. A. HUDDLESTON Niece S Female W 21 TN House Keeper TN TN
J. R. HUDDLESTON Nephew S Male W 18 TN Laborer On Farm TN TN
J. M. HUDDLESTON Nephew S Male W 15 TN Laborer On Farm TN TN
S. J. HUDDLESTON Nephew S Male W 13 TN TN TN
Ada SMITH Other S Female W 5 TN TN TN
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place District 17, Wilson, Tennessee
Family History Library Film 1255287
NA Film Number T9-1287
Page Number 518A

109. Martha HUDDLESTON (Martha WINSTON , Anthony , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born in 1795 in Buckingham, Virginia. She died in Shelby Co, TN.

Martha married Isaac Winston BROOKS on 5 Feb 1818 in Lebanon, Wilson, TN. Isaac was born about 1799 in Virginia.

1850 census
Isaac Brooks District 6, Shelby, TN abt 1799 Virginia
Martha Brooks District 6, Shelby, TN abt 1818 Virginia
James Brooks District 6, Shelby, TN abt 1831 Tennessee
Margaret Brooks District 6, Shelby, TN abt 1834 Tennessee
Hugh Brooks District 6, Shelby, TN abt 1835 Tennessee

Isaac and Martha had the following children:

  141 M i James BROOKS was born about 1831 in Tennessee.
  142 F ii Margaret BROOKS was born about 1834 in Tennessee.
  143 M iii Hugh BROOKS was born about 1835 in Tennessee.

110. George Augustus HUDDLESTON (Martha WINSTON , Anthony , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born in 1797 in Buckingham, Virginia. He died in 1883 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.

George A. Huddleston found in:
Marriage Index: IL, IN, KY, OH, TN 1720-1926
Spouse: Harriet S. Cummings Marriage Date: Feb 23, 1824 Location: Wilson Co., Tennessee

1820 census
Abram Huddleston Southern District,Bedford,VA 1820
George Huddleston Southern District,Bedford,VA 1820
Henry Huddleston Southern District,Bedford,VA 1820
Sally Huddleston Southern District,Bedford,VA 1820

1830 census
Gilbert Cook Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (110001-01001) age 30-40 - Image 25
Green Cook Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (021001-000011) age 30-40 - Image 152
Thomas Cook Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (0000001-000001001) age 40-50 - Image 164
Geo A Huddleson Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (010001-10001) age 30-40 - Image 90
Anthony Huddleston Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee (111001-101001) age 30-40 - Image 112

1860 census
G A Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 60 1799 Virginia Male
Harriette Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 54 1805 Tennessee Female
Franklin Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 25 1834 Tennessee Male
Harriette Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 23 1836 Tennessee Female
Martha Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 21 1838 Tennessee Female
William Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 18 1841 Tennessee Male
Felix Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 16 1843 Tennessee Male
Napoleon Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 14 1845 Tennessee Male
Andrew Huddleston District 20, Wilson, TN 7 1852 Tennessee Male

1870 census - Wilson Co, TN

George married Harriet S. CUMMINGS on 23 Feb 1824 in Wilson Co, Tennessee. Harriet was born in 1805 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.

1870 census - Wilson Co, TN

George and Harriet had the following children:

  144 M i Granderson Perkins HUDDLESTON was born on 19 Dec 1824 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.

1880 census
G. P. HUDDLESTON Self M Male W 55 TN Farms VA TN
E. J. HUDDLESTON Wife M Female W 51 SC Keep House SC SC
R. D. VAUGHAN SonL M Male W 36 TN TN TN
S. C. VAUGHAN SDau M Female W 34 TN TN SC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place District 23, Wilson, Tennessee
Family History Library Film 1255287
NA Film Number T9-1287
Page Number 580A
        Granderson married Dora Eugenia ? LEWIS daughter of James ? LEWIS. Dora was born on 27 Oct 1829 in Wilson Co, TN.
  145 F ii Indiana HUDDLESTON was born in 1826 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.
  146 F iii Lydia Ann HUDDLESTON was born in 1826 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.
  147 F iv Josephine HUDDLESTON was born on 17 Dec 1829 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.
+ 148 M v George Monroe HUDDLESTON
  149 M vi Franklin HUDDLESTON was born about 1834 in Tennessee.
  150 F vii Martha HUDDLESTON was born about 1838 in Tennessee.
  151 M viii William HUDDLESTON was born about 1841 in Tennessee.

Possible:
1880 census
W. L. HUDDLESTON Self M Male W 38 TN Farmer VA TN
M. E. HUDDLESTON Wife M Female W 33 TN Keeping House TN TN
O. W. HUDDLESTON Son S Male W 11 TN Laborer TN TN
C. C. HUDDLESTON Son S Male W 10 TN Laborer TN TN
H. E. HUDDLESTON Dau S Female W 8 TN TN TN
S. F. HUDDLESTON Dau S Female W 6 TN TN TN
G. A. HUDDLESTON Son S Male W 4 TN TN TN
M. E. HUDDLESTON Dau S Female W 2 TN TN TN
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place District 20, Wilson, Tennessee
Family History Library Film 1255287
NA Film Number T9-1287
Page Number 555D
  152 M ix Felix HUDDLESTON was born about 1843 in Tennessee.
  153 M x Napoleon HUDDLESTON was born about 1845 in Tennessee.
  154 M xi Andrew HUDDLESTON was born about 1852 in Tennessee.

113. William Winston HUDDLESTON (Martha WINSTON , Anthony , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born in 1808 in Virginia. He died on 29 Sep 1855 in Tennessee.

1840 census
W W Huddleston Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee
A Hudleston Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee
P P Hudson Not Stated, Wilson, Tennessee

1850 census
William W Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1808 Virginia
Mary Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1814 North Carolina
Joseph Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1832 Tennessee
Thomas Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1835 Tennessee
Patrick Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1837 Tennessee
Valaria Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1839 Tennessee
William Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1840 Tennessee
Mary Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1842 Tennessee
Elvira Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1844 Tennessee
Ugenia Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1847 Tennessee
Adelia Huddleson District 17, Wilson, TN abt 1848 Tennessee

Genealogical Records: Early Tennessee Settlers, 1700s-1900s
Listed in: Tombstone Inscriptions and Manuscripts
Page number: 422
William W. Huddleston
Mary B. Tarver
Jan. 18, 1828
Surety: Charles Sullivan

William married Mary TARVER on 16 Jan 1828 in Tennessee . Mary was born about 1814 in North Carolina. She died prob bef 1860.

They had the following children:

  155 M i Joseph HUDDLESTON was born about 1832 in Tennessee.
  156 M ii J. W. HUDDLESTON was born in 1834 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.

J.W. was a physician and surgeon in Lebanon, TN. He attended the academy of Wilson Co., TN and the University of Nashville. He studied medicine under Dr. Alsup. He entered the medical dept. of the Nashville University, graduating in March 1857 as an M.D. He practiced for sometime in Nashville and afterward in Wilson Co. Then in Marshall Co., TN in 1877. He finally located to Lebanon, TN. He was a leading man in his profession and in 1862 was surgeon in the Confederate Armies. Politically, he was a Wig and then a Democrat. He married Alice Robertson, daughter of Dr. Peyton and Ellen (Davis) Robertson, who was the granddaughter of Gen. James Robertson, one of Tennessee's most noted pioneers and for whom Robertson Co. was named. (Goodspeed Histories p. 1101)
        J. W. HUDDLESTON married Alice ROBERTSON in Feb 1858 in Nashville, TN. Alice was born in 1838 in Nashville, TN.
+ 157 M iii Thomas L. HUDDLESTON
  158 M iv Patrick HUDDLESTON was born about 1837 in Tennessee.
  159 F v Valaria HUDDLESTON was born about 1839 in Tennessee.

1860 census
E S Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 42 1817 Tennessee Male
Martha Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 29 1830 Tennessee Female
Laura Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Female
Samuel Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 7 1852 Tennessee Male
Mary Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 4 1855 Tennessee Female
William Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 2 1857 Tennessee Male
Valeria Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 21 1838 Tennessee Female
W W Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 19 1840 Tennessee Male
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 18 1841 Tennessee Female
Eliza Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 15 1844 Tennessee Female
Eugenia Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 13 1846 Tennessee Female
Adelaide Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 11 1848 Tennessee Female
Henry Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Male
Isaac W Dill District 17, Wilson, TN 33 1826 Tennessee Male
  160 M vi William W. HUDDLESTON was born about 1840 in Tennessee.

1860 census
E S Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 42 1817 Tennessee Male
Martha Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 29 1830 Tennessee Female
Laura Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Female
Samuel Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 7 1852 Tennessee Male
Mary Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 4 1855 Tennessee Female
William Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 2 1857 Tennessee Male
Valeria Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 21 1838 Tennessee Female
W W Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 19 1840 Tennessee Male
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 18 1841 Tennessee Female
Eliza Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 15 1844 Tennessee Female
Eugenia Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 13 1846 Tennessee Female
Adelaide Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 11 1848 Tennessee Female
Henry Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Male
Isaac W Dill District 17, Wilson, TN 33 1826 Tennessee Male
  161 F vii Mary HUDDLESTON was born about 1842 in Tennessee.
  162 F viii Elvira HUDDLESTON was born about 1844 in Tennessee.
  163 F ix Eugenia HUDDLESTON was born about 1847 in Tennessee.

1860 census
E S Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 42 1817 Tennessee Male
Martha Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 29 1830 Tennessee Female
Laura Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Female
Samuel Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 7 1852 Tennessee Male
Mary Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 4 1855 Tennessee Female
William Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 2 1857 Tennessee Male
Valeria Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 21 1838 Tennessee Female
W W Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 19 1840 Tennessee Male
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 18 1841 Tennessee Female
Eliza Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 15 1844 Tennessee Female
Eugenia Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 13 1846 Tennessee Female
Adelaide Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 11 1848 Tennessee Female
Henry Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Male
Isaac W Dill District 17, Wilson, TN 33 1826 Tennessee Male
  164 F x Adelia HUDDLESTON was born about 1848 in Tennessee.

1860 census
E S Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 42 1817 Tennessee Male
Martha Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 29 1830 Tennessee Female
Laura Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Female
Samuel Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 7 1852 Tennessee Male
Mary Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 4 1855 Tennessee Female
William Smith District 17, Wilson, TN 2 1857 Tennessee Male
Valeria Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 21 1838 Tennessee Female
W W Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 19 1840 Tennessee Male
Elizabeth Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 18 1841 Tennessee Female
Eliza Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 15 1844 Tennessee Female
Eugenia Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 13 1846 Tennessee Female
Adelaide Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 11 1848 Tennessee Female
Henry Huddleston District 17, Wilson, TN 9 1850 Tennessee Male
Isaac W Dill District 17, Wilson, TN 33 1826 Tennessee Male
  165 M xi Henry HUDDLESTON was born about 1850 in Tennessee.

114. Jordan WINSTON (Isaac , Anthony , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born in 1809 in North Carolina.

1850 census
Jordan Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1809 North Carolina
Delana Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1813 North Carolina
Susanna Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1834 North Carolina
William C Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1835 North Carolina
Micajah Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1836 North Carolina
Nathanie Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1839 North Carolina
Anne E Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1843 Alabama
John T Winston Southern District, Pickens, AL abt 1846 Alabama

Jordan married Delana. Delana was born about 1813 in North Carolina.

They had the following children:

  166 F i Susanna WINSTON was born about 1834 in North Carolina.
  167 M ii William C. WINSTON was born about 1835 in North Carolina.
  168 M iii Micajah WINSTON was born about 1836 in North Carolina.
  169 M iv Nathaniel WINSTON was born about 1839 in North Carolina.
  170 F v Anne E. WINSTON was born about 1843 in Alabama.
  171 M vi John T. WINSTON was born about 1846 in Alabama.

115. William C. WINSTON (Isaac , Anthony , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born in 1815 in Wilson Co, Tennessee. He died on 26 Mar 1894 in Huntsville, Alabama.

ID: I18330 Name: William C Winston Given Name: William C Surname: Winston Sex: M Birth: 1815 in Wilson Tn Death: 26 MAR 1894 in Huntsville Al

William married Rebecca J. CASON on 20 Feb 1836 in Wilson Co, Tennessee. Rebecca was born in 1815 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.

They had the following children:

  172 M i William WINSTON was born in 1845 in Wilson Co, Tennessee.
+ 173 M ii Robert Fountain WINSTON

119. William WINSTON (Capt. Anthony , Anthony , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born on 24 Mar 1789 in Buckingham, Virginia. He died on 27 Apr 1857 in Franklin, Alabama.

William married (1) Mary Polly (Bacon) COOPER.

William married (2) Judith McGraw JONES before 1828 in Alabama. Judith was born in 1807 in of Alabama.

They had the following children:

  174 M i Judith McGraw WINSTON was born on 21 Nov 1841 in Franklin, Alabama.

128. Jesse WINSTON (Anthony ? , George , Isaac , Anthony , William , Isaac ) was born about 1789 in of Franklin, NC. He died on 4 May 1848 in Franklin, NC.

North Carolina Census Records
JESSE WINSTON NC Franklin County No Reg. Listed Mr 1814

Jesse married Salley THARRINGTON on 20 Feb 1808 in Franklin, NC. Salley was born about 1790 in Franklin, NC.

They had the following children:

  175 M i Drayton WINSTON was born on 26 Nov 1810 in Franklin, NC. He died on 19 Jun 1884 in Butler, Bates, Missouri. He was buried in Morris Cem., Butler, Bates, Missouri .

ID: I121 Name: Drayton Winston Surname: Winston Given Name: Drayton
        Drayton married Mary Ann COOK daughter of Howell C. COOK and Leah KEARNEY on 15 May 1833 in Franklin, NC. Mary was born on 30 Oct 1813 in Franklin, North Carolina.

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