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Descendants of John MARGRAVE

Fourth Generation

19. Edward Calvin MARGRAVE (Felix , Jesse E. , John ) was born on 10 Jul 1838 in LaSalle, Illinois. He died on 15 Sep 1883 in Cook Co., ILL.

1870 Census - Linn Co, Missouri
Edward Margrave 32 M Ill. Farmer - Real Estate Val. $4,000 -
Personal Property $500
Sarah 26 F NC House Keeper
Lenmer 3 M MO
Hugh 36 M Ill. No Occupation
Franklin 34 M Ill.
Clarissa Moore 24 F NC House Keeper
Frank Moore 18 M NC

Edward married Eliza GREEN on 3 Jan 1876 in Le Clede, Linn, Missouri. Eliza was born in Dec 1837 in Ripley, Chautauqua Co, New York. She died after 1920.

They had the following children:

+ 56 M i Sidney Hardy MARGRAVE
  57 M ii Chester MARGRAVE was born about 1878 in Laclede, Linn, MO.

Roster of Men and Women Who Served in The World War From Colorado 1917-1918
Weld County
Given Name: Chester E.
Surname: Margrave
Rank: Private
Branch: S. A. T. C.
Place: Pierce
(NOTE: Uncertain if this is the same Chester Margrave - most likely this is his son)

22. David M. MARGRAVE (Felix , Jesse E. , John ) was born on 11 Jun 1827 in Bond Co., Illinois. He died on 17 Feb 1900 in Centralia, Nemaha Co., Kansas.

SOURCE:
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/lmargrave1/gp20.html

1880 US FEDERAL CENSUS
David MARGRAVE Self M Male W 51 IL Farmer KY KY
Martha MARGRAVE Wife M Female W 51 IN Keeping House OH OH
Lelia MARGRAVE Dau S Female W 22 IL School Teacher IL IN
Nettie MARGRAVE Dau S Female W 19 IL Dress Maker IL IN
Minnie MARGRAVE Dau S Female W 16 IL At School IL IN
Clara MARGRAVE Dau S Female W 13 IL At School IL IN
Frank MARGRAVE Son S Male W 9 IL IL IN
Elizabeth WARNOCK SisterL S Female W 49 IN OH SC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place Round Grove, Livingston, Illinois
Family History Library Film 1254226
NA Film Number T9-0226
Page Number 422B


1870 US FEDERAL CENSUS
Name: David Margrave
Age in 1870: 43
Estimated Birth Year: 1826
Birthplace: Illinois
Home in 1870: Round Grove, Livingston, Illinois
Race: White
Gender: Male
Value of real estate: View Image
Post Office: Dwight
Roll: M593_247
Page: 347
David Margrave, age 43, farmer
Martha, age 42, b. ILL
Emma, age 20, b. ILL
Alice, age 16, b. ILL
Selia, age 13, b. ILL
Nettie, age 10, b. ILL
Minnie, age 6, b. ILL
Clara, age 3, b. ILL

David married Martha. Martha was born about 1828 in Indiana or Illinois.

They had the following children:

  58 F i Emma MARGRAVE was born about 1850 in Illinois.
  59 F ii Alice MARGRAVE was born about 1854 in Illinois.
  60 F iii Lelia MARGRAVE was born about 1857 in Illinois.
  61 F iv Nettie MARGRAVE was born about 1860 in Illinois.
  62 F v Minnie MARGRAVE was born about 1864 in Illinois.
  63 F vi Clara MARGRAVE was born about 1867 in Illinois.
  64 M vii Frank MARGRAVE was born about 1871 in Illinois.

25. J. W. MARGRAVE (John , Jesse E. , John ) was born about 1815 in Kentucky.

1850 Census - Keokirk Twp, Lee, Iowa
J. W. Margrave, 35, KY, Physician
Elizabeth, 34, OH
Thomas E, 11, IA
Jane, 9, IL
Charles T, 7, IL
William A, 5, IL
Melissa, 3, IA
Susan J, 1, IA
Laura Hummer, 2 mos, IA

1860 Census - Township 58 Range 18, Linn, Missouri
John Margrave, 69, carpenter, SC
Nancy, 65, GA
John M Margrave, 30, IL
NEXT DOOR:
J. W. Margrave, 45,KY
Elizabeth, 44, OH
Jane, 19, IL
Charles T, 16, IL
William A, 15, IL
Melissa, 12, IL
Susan J, 11, IA
Louisa H, 9, IA
Martha A, 3, Wisconsin

J. W. MARGRAVE married Elizabeth. Elizabeth was born about 1816 in Ohio.

They had the following children:

  65 M i Thomas E. MARGRAVE was born about 1839 in Iowa.
  66 F ii Jane MARGRAVE was born about 1841 in Illinois.
  67 M iii Charles T. MARGRAVE was born about 1844 in Illinois.
  68 M iv William A. MARGRAVE was born about 1845 in Illinois.
  69 F v Melissa MARGRAVE was born about 1848 in Illinois.
  70 F vi Susan J MARGRAVE was born about 1849 in Iowa.
  71 F vii Louisa H. MARGRAVE was born about 1851 in Iowa.
  72 F viii Martha A. MARGRAVE was born about 1857 in Wisconsin.

30. Thomas W. MARGRAVE (Anthony , Jesse E. , John ) was born in 1816 in Kentucky or Viginia. He died prob before 1860.

MISSOURI CENSUS
Name: THOMAS W. MARGRAVE
State: MO
County: Jasper County
Township: Being 41st District
Year: 1850
Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
Page: 403

1850 US FEDERAL CENSUS - Jasper, Missouri
Thomas W. Margrave, age 34, b. KY
Nancy, age 34, b. MO
Thaddeus, age 13, b. MO
Brunetta, age 12, b. MO
Beal, age 11, b. MO
William, age 9, b. MO
Benjamin F., age 4, b. MO
Josephine B, age 1, b. MO

Thomas married Nancy. Nancy was born in 1816 in Missouri or Virginia. She died prob before 1860.

They had the following children:

+ 73 M i P. Thadius MARGRAVES
  74 F ii Brunetta MARGRAVE was born about 1838 in Missouri.
  75 M iii Beal MARGRAVE was born about 1839 in Missouri.
+ 76 M iv William H. MARGRAVE
  77 M v Benjamin F. MARGRAVE was born about 1846 in Missouri.
  78 F vi Josephine B. MARGRAVE was born about 1849 in Missouri.

1860 Census - Jasper, Jasper, Missouri
Alonzo F. Clanton, 32, farmer, MO
Ameline A. Clanton, 18, MO
Benjamin F. Margrave, 27, UNKNOWN, farmer
Ruth Margrave, 65, MO
Joephine Margrave, 10, MO

31. Hon. William MARGRAVE (Anthony , Jesse E. , John ) was born on 17 Feb 1818 in Caldwell Co., Kentucky. He died on 29 Sep 1904 in Fort Scott, Kansas.

Missouri Marriages to 1850:
Baker, Mahaly Margraves, William 27 Mar 1840 Missouri
Gasconade County

SOURCE: History of Bourbon County Fort Scott, Kansas
William Margrave was born in Missouri, February 17 1818. He came here in the fall of 1854, and was appointed one of the first Justices of the Peace in the Territory, and the very first one appointed in this district. His commission bears date of December 5, 1854. He has lived here continuously ever since that time, and he is Justice of the Peace "till yet." The Judge, in his quiet way, has always performed the duties of a good citizen, and always stood in the highest estimation in this community. Margrave street in the city of Fort Scott was named for him.

On March 8, 1855, a proclamation was issued by Gov. Reeder, ordering an election for members of the Territorial Council and House of Representatives, to he held on Friday the 30th day of March, 1855. There were to be thirteen members of the Council and twenty-six Representatives, to constitute the "Legislative Assembly" of the Territory. The vote was to be by ballot. As there were yet no county or ether municipal organizations, the election districts were provided for in the proclamation. The Sixth District remained the same as in the election of November 10, 1854. The place designated for holding the polls was the hospital building on the Plaza, and the judges of election appointed were James Ray, William Painter and William Godfrey. The proclamation also provided:

"That the Sixth Election District, containing two hundred and fifty-three votes, will constitute the Fifth Council District, and elect one member of the Council. Also, that the Sixth Election District shall be the Sixth Representative District and elect two members."

The result of this election was as follows: For Council Fifth District, William Barbee, 343 Votes. For Representatives Sixth District, Joseph C. Anderson, 315, S. A. Williams 313, John Hamilton 36, William Margrave 16. And the returns being in due form and no protest filed, William Barbee for the Council, and Joseph C. Anderson and S. A. Williams for the House of Representatives, were by the Governor declared duly elected.

CHAPTER VI
THE FIRST GOVERNOR
H. REEDER, the first Governor of Kansas Territory, arrived at Fort Leavenworth, and assumed the executive office October 7th, 1854. Soon after, with a party of other officials, he made a somewhat extended tour of observation through the eastern part of the Territory, and on his return that portion was divided into "Election Districts." The district which included Fort Scott was denominated the Sixth District, and the metes and bounds were described as follows:
"Commencing on the Missouri State line in Little Osage river; thence up the same to the line of the Reserve for the New York Indians, or the nearest point thereto; thence to and by the north line of said Reserve to the Neosho river, and up said river to and along south branch thereof to the head; and thence by a due south line to the southern line of the Territory; thence by the southern and eastern line of said Territory to the place of beginning."
THE FIRST ELECTIONS.
On November 10th, Governor Reeder issued a proclamation for an election to be held in the Territory the 29th day of November for the election of a Delegate to Congress. Fort Scott was designated as the place for holding the election for the Sixth District. The house of H. T. Wilson was named as the polling place, and the judges appointed were Thomas B. Arnett, H. T. Wilson and William Godfrey. J. W. Whitfield was the Pro-slavery candidate for Delegate, R. P. Finnekin, Independent, and John A. Wakefield Free State. In this district Whitfied received the entire vote cast, 105. Whitfield resided in Missouri at this time and made no pretense of being a citizen of the Territory.
On March 8, 1855, a proclamation was issued by Gov. Reeder, ordering an election for members of the Territorial Council and House of Representatives, to he held on Friday the 30th day of March, 1855. There were to be thirteen members of the Council and twenty-six Representatives, to constitute the "Legislative Assembly" of the Territory. The vote was to be by ballot. As there were yet no county or ether municipal organizations, the election districts were provided for in the proclamation. The Sixth District remained the same as in the election of November 10, 1854. The place designated for holding the polls was the hospital building on the Plaza, and the judges of election appointed were James Ray, William Painter and William Godfrey. The proclamation also provided:
"That the Sixth Election District, containing two hundred and fifty-three votes, will constitute the Fifth Council District, and elect one member of the Council. Also, that the Sixth Election District shall be the Sixth Representative District and elect two members."
The result of this election was as follows: For Council Fifth District, William Barbee, 343 Votes. For Representatives Sixth District, Joseph C. Anderson, 315, S. A. Williams 313, John Hamilton 36, William Margrave 16. And the returns being in due form and no protest filed, William Barbee for the Council, and Joseph C. Anderson and S. A. Williams for the House of Representatives, were by the Governor declared duly elected.
Nevertheless this election was grossly fraudulent, not only in this district, but in all others. It will be remembered that the district was nearly 50 by 100 miles square. William Barbee, mentioned above, had been appointed the January before to take the census of the district, and about March 1, thirty days before the election, filed his report giving the number of legal voters as 253. Many of these voters would have had to travel forty and fifty miles to the polling place. It is not reasonable to suppose that they took such a journey to vote. Most of the votes cast came from covered wagons camped on the Marmaton bottom, "for 1 one day only," which Judge Margrave said, "just swarmed over from Missouri." But there was no protest in this district, and the men took their seats in the Legislature.
Barbee had no opposition. He and Anderson and Williams were voted for by the Pro-slavery men. Hamilton and Margrave received the feeble showing of the opposition.
William Barbee came here from Kentucky at the age of 29. He was a very fair man, and lived here several years. Barbee street in Fort Scott was named for him.
Joseph C. Anderson was never a resident of the district from first to last. He was the author of the "Black Laws" passed by this Legislature.
Samuel A. Williams was originally from Kentucky. He came here first in 1854, and afterwards brought his family, about six months before election, from Polk County, Missouri, driving an ox cart, containing his family, his chickens and two "cheers." He was no "voter." He had come to stay. He was a good man, a good citizen, and held many important positions. He died at his home in Fort Scott, August 13, 1873.
John Hamilton was "left over" from the regular army. He lived here in the town and in the county until after the war, as has been stated.
William Margrave was born in Missouri, February 17 1818. He came here in the fall of 1854, and was appointed one of the first Justices of the Peace in the Territory, and the very first one appointed in this district. His commission bears date of December 5, 1854. He has lived here continuously ever since that time, and he is Justice of the Peace "till yet." The Judge, in his quiet way, has always performed the duties of a good citizen, and always stood in the highest estimation in this community. Margrave street in the city of Fort Scott was named for him.
THE FIRST LBGISLATURE
The first Legislature convened by order of the Governor at Pawnee, near Fort Riley, on the 2nd of July, 1855. Pawnee was 100 miles west of the Missouri State line at Westport. Governor Reeder said he took it out there to get it out of the way of political influence and to keep the legislators unspotted from the world. That was certainly the right idea and the right place if he could have made them stay there, but he couldn't do it. The statesmen said it was too dry, and too far from their base of supplies; and besides, as there were no houses in Pawnee, or in forty miles of it, they had to sleep in their wagons, or under them; and then again they had nothiug to eat but jerked buffalo and Pawnee macarroni. This latter was a very succulent dish much sought after by the Pawnee Indians. It was made from the small entrails of antelope and fish-worms. The origin of this war-like tribe arose from this dish. Most any body wonld. The statesmen arose from it. Said they liked the legislature business all right enough but this wasn't an adjourned session of the Diet of Worms; they were not elected on that ticket. Said they didn't know what other Kansas Legislatures might do - No man in his right mind could tell, but as for their part they could not entertain such a diet, anyway, without something to go with it, and they didn't even have Bourbon County corn bread. Besides, they wanted to be nearer home where they could hear the honest coon-dog's deep-mouthed bay. So next morning they hitched up and drove down to Shawnee Mission, near Westport. That was as near home as they could get without going "plum over" into Missouri. Reeder could do nothing but set around and scratch his head and pawnee. He finally followed them down to Shawnee Mission. He told them they could not legally move, and could pass no valid laws if they did. They told him to be quiet or they would pass him down the Missouri river on a raft. That made him madder than ever and he called them a lot of Border Ruffians. Then Stringfellow smote him hip and thigh, "and they wrote a letter unto the king," saying what a bad man this Reeder was, "and the king dismissed him with contumely." But the name give to them by Governor Reeder of Border Ruffian stuck to those fellows, and their kind, even to the third generation. Ainsi soit il.
THE BOGUS STATUTE.
The Legislature then went to work to pass laws for Kansas. It was now the 16th of July. By the 1st of September they had finished their labors which resulted in the preparation of an immense code of "laws," which have always been called and known as the "Bogus Statute of 1855." This Statute was called bogus principally because many of the members were not residents of the Territory, and they were themselves bogus; the elections were fraudulent in nearly every case, consequently their office was bogus. The sessions were held at Shawnee Mission against the will, order and veto of the Governor who had the only legal right to decide that point, as he claimed, consequently the whole business really had no legal status or right to be. But it was the prologue of the opening drama. The Pro-slavery men here showed their hand and the true spirit and intent of their party. They at once became blustering, arrogant, defiant and overbearing, and continually sought to pick quarrels with, and embroil every man into difficulties who opposed them. The few scattering and unorganized Free State men, in contemplation of such acts and such men, stood with raised and outstretched hands as if warding off a blow.
SAMPLE OF LEGISLATION.
The Legislature did more by its drastic, ill-tempered and senseless legislation to destroy the prospect of making Kansas a slave State than did all the Emigrant Aid Societies, John Brown and other Nortbern fanatics put together. As a sample of their legislation and to show the spirit which controlled the Pro-slavery side on the threshold of the struggle, the following section of their laws is quoted:
"SEC. 12. If any person, by speaking or by writing, assert or maintain that persons have not the right to hold slaves in the Territory, or shall introduce into Kansas, print, publish, write, circulate, or cause to be introduced into the Territory, any book, paper, magazine, pamphlet or circular containing any denial of the rights of persons to hold slaves in this Territory, such person shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and punished by imprisonment at hard labor for a term not less than two years."
This made it a penitentiary offense for a person to take a Free-State paper, or to argue the question with a aeighbor, even at his own fireside. The present generation cannot conceive that a body of educated and intelligent American men could have seriously placed such a law, and a hundred of similar tenor and import on the statute books of a State. But the indescribable fanaticism on the question of human slavery had made them, as a people, just that intolerant.
On the other hand the Northern people, as a people, said to the South exactly this: We have made a constant, consistent and honest effort to restrict slavery to its present limits, and although the sacred compact which has stood for a third of a century is broken down, let us peacefully abide the provisions of the squatter sovereign principle. And we now say to you Southern people, and you may be fully assured that, although we shall not desist from those open, honest efforts which we have constantly made for restriction and which efforts will be vigorously continued to make Kansas a Free State, we shall neither openly or secretly resort to any measures which can tend to disturb the tranquillity of the slave States, or thereby to affect the prosperity of the Nation. And thus at the commencement of that most momentous era was the virgin Territory of Kansas handed over to those two contending sections, who had "come to ope the purple testament of bleeding war."
It looked dark for the side of Freedom. Its enemies controlled the Administration; they controlled all the branches of the Territorial Government and they controlled the front door through which emigration must enter.
BOURBON COUNTY ORGANIZED.
The buildings erected and the improvements made by the Government at Fort Scott were estimated to have cost $200,000. They were sold at public auction on the 16th day of May, 1855, by Major Howe, Assistant Quartermaster of the U. S. Army, for less than $5,000 for the whole business. The officers quarters the four principal blocks of buildings, were disposed of as follows: A. Hornbeck bought the first block, on the west corner of the Plaza for $500. H. T. Wilson the next for $300, B. Greenwood the next for $505, and J. Mitchell bought the next building on the east for $450. The other buildings were sold to different parties for nominal sums. Of course, this not being a Government Reservation, the title to the land on which these buildings stood did not pass by this transaction, and it was so understood by the purchasers. But they concluded to "let the hide go with the tallow," and take their chances of acquiring title either from the Government as preemptors, or, that some time in the future when the town shall have been surveyed and platted, and a legally incorporated town company organized, they could obtain deeds. This plan was agreed on and was afterwards carried out.

ANOTHER KANSAS HISTORICAL SOCIETY DOCUMENT
(This one gives a different birthdate for William Margrave (same year and state) and a different spouse (Sarah Hefton - Uncertain if this the same Wm Margrave since 1880 census shows his father's birthplace as Ireland)
Elisha H. Rollins, partner of Mr. Ireland in the proprietorship of the Ireland & Rollins Planing Mills Company, and one of the progressive and energetic business men of Fort Scott, was born March 15, 1859, on Prince Edward Island, a son of John and Mary (Harker) Rollins, natives of that place, who passed their entire lives there in agricultural pursuits. The father died in 1909, at the age of seventy-five years, while the mother passed away many years before, being forty-seven years old at the time of her demise.

The fourth in a family of nine children, Elisha H. Rollins received a public school education, and in his youth learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed at his native place until 1876. In that year he came to Kansas City, Missouri, where he followed his trade for three years, and then came to Fort Scott and continued at his trade as a journeyman until he joined Mr. Ireland in the planing mill business. Like his partner, Mr. Rollins is a man of foresight and good judgment, a thorough business man, and a citizen of high character and standing. He is a republican in politics, a Presbyterian in his religious faith, and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Fraternal Union.

On August 30, 1886, at Fort Scott, Mr. Rollins was married to Miss Jennie Margrave, daughter of Hon. William and Sarah (Hefton) Margrave. They have one son: William M., born October 22, 1888, a graduate of the Fort Scott High School and the Kansas State Normal School, of Pittsburg, who has taught three years in the public schools of Fort Scott and two years in the Wichita High School.

Hon. William Margrave, father of Mrs. Rollins, was born in Barton County, Missouri, January 17, 1818, studied law, was admitted to the bar in Missouri in 1851, and in 1854 came to Fort Scott. In November of that year he was appointed justice of the peace by Governor Andrew Reeder, and his subsequent service in that office has never been equalled in continuity, for had he lived but a few months longer he would have rounded out a half century in that position of honor and responsibility. His death occurred September 29, 1904, when the people of city, county and state mourned. Coming to the town of Fort Scott when it was still in its infancy, he watched its growth and development through the passing years, and did much to assist in its transformation into one of the leading cities of the West. He was the first justice of the peace in the State of Kansas, and, unlike many who came after him, had a thorough knowledge of civil and criminal law, so that he was able to dispense justice in a fair manner, as evidenced by the fact that his decisions were seldom reversed. He was a remarkably fine judge of character and human nature, and while he was stern and courageous in his handling of law-breakers, was at heart kindly disposed and a stanch and tried friend of the unfortunate. In his death Fort Scott lost one of its first and foremost citizens, a man universally respected and beloved.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Transcribed from volume 4, pages 2093-2095 of A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans, written and compiled by William E. Connelley


MISSOURI CENSUS
Name: WILLIAM MARGRAVE
State: MO
County: Jasper County
Township: Being 41st District
Year: 1850
Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
Page: 396


1850 Census, District 41, Jasper, Missouri
William Margrave, age 32, farmer, MO
Malinda, age 33, ??
James, age 9, MO
Rebecca, age 13, ILL
Robert, age 6, MO
Anthony, age 5, MO

1880 US FEDERAL CENSUS - Bourbon County, Kansas (Uncertain if this the same Wm Margrave since it shows his father's birthplace as Ireland - the document above shows the wife of Wm Margrave as being Sarah Hefton. It is possible that he married a second time and had the following daughters with Sarah)
William Margrave, age 62, lawyer, b. MO
Jennie, age 20, b. KS
Mary, age 18, b. KS

William married Mahala Caroline "Malinda" BAKER, daughter of James BAKER and Rebecca SMALL, on 27 Mar 1840 in Gasconade Co., MO. Mahala was born in 1817 in Iowa.

They had the following children:

  79 M i James MARGRAVE was born in 1841 in Missouri.
  80 M ii Robert MARGRAVE was born in 1844 in Missouri.
  81 M iii Anthony MARGRAVE was born in 1845 in Missouri.

1870 US CENSUS - Scott, Bourbon, KS
Anthony Margrave, age 24, b. MO, Laborer, single
  82 F iv Rebecca MARGRAVE was born about 1837 in Illinois.

Since Rebecca was born before William and Malinda were married, she may have another mother

32. Nancy MARGRAVE (Anthony , Jesse E. , John ) was born on 23 Feb 1822 in Missouri. She died on 23 Jan 1906 in Pagosa Springs, Co and was buried in Hilltop Cemetery, Archuleta Co., Colorado.

Source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mbonsal/simpson/zwmsr1.html

Nancy married Andrew Jackson BRANSON, son of Andrew Daniel BRANSON and Phariba (or Paraby) COX (COCK), on 14 Jan 1841 in Gasconade Co, Mo. Andrew was born on 30 Oct 1819 in near Chattanooga, Tennessee. He died in 1904 in Pagosa Springs, Co and was buried in Hilltop Cemetery, Archuleta Co., Colorado.

Bureau of Land Management Records:
RECORD NUMBER 1:
Patentee: ANDREW BRANSON
State: COLORADO
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Issue Date: 5/16/1878
Land Office: Assigned For Automation
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)

RECORD NUMBER 2:
Patentee: ANDREW J SENIOR BRANSON
State: COLORADO
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Issue Date: 3/1/1886
Land Office: Assigned For Automation
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: May 20, 1862: Homestead EntryOriginal (12 Stat. 392)

1880 Census:
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
Andrew BRANSON Self M Male W 60 TN Ranchman VA VA
Nancy BRANSON Wife M Female W 58 MO Keeps House NC KY
Jack BRANSON Son S Male W 28 MO Stage Driver TN MO
Ben BRANSON Son S Male W 23 MO Ranchman TN MO
Jessie BRANSON Son S Male W 21 MO Ranchman TN MO
Jefferson BRANSON Son S Male W 18 MO Ranchman TN MO
Tom GARLICK Son (?) S Male W 6 CO Ranchman VA MO
John HIGGINS Other S Male W 56 IRE Laborer IRE IRE
H. CLINE Other S Male W 32 PRUSSIA Laborer PRUSSIA PRUSSIA
Mike WALKER Other W Male W 50 IRE Laborer IRE IRE
James JOHNSON Other S Male W 29 NY Laborer IRE IRE
James BOYLE Other S Male W 23 IRE Laborer IRE IRE
James MC GOUD Other S Male W 38 IRE Laborer IRE IRE
N. D. LARSON Other S Male W 27 SWE Laborer SWE SWE
Schnell JACQUES Other S Male W 45 FRANCE Laborer FRANCE FRANCE
Tom MURPHY Other S Male W 32 IRE Laborer IRE IRE
Joseph ROGERS Other S Male W 39 VA Laborer MD LA
Rudolf HANGARTNER Other S Male W 47 SWI Laborer SWI SWI

Census Place La Jara And Alamos Rios, Conejos, Colorado Family History Library Film 1254089 NA Film Number T9-0089 Page Number 192C

Civil War Service Records:

Surname Given Name Middle Initial Company Unit Rank - Induction Rank - Discharge Notes Allegiance
Branson Andrew J. K 2 Colorado Cavalry. Private Private Union
Branson Andrew J. C 3 Colorado Infantry. Private Private Union

---------------------------
Source: http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/periodicals/wrv/V1/N2/W61b.htm

Wherever frontiersmen ventured, there seem to have been Bransons. Some followed their Carolina neighbor, Daniel Boone, into Kentucky. Some went to Tennessee, perhaps along with the Crockett family, who were also neighbors back in Virginia. One of four Branson cousins who left North Carolina to settle in Tennessee about 1789 was John Branson, a great-grandson of Thomas. John's grandson, born just west of Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1819, was named for the hero of the Battle of New Orleans of the War of 1812 (in which we also find Bransons fighting), and became Andrew Jackson Branson. According to Mr. Joseph M. Branson of Kansas City, Missouri, this was the branch of the Branson family which moved to Gasconade County, Missouri in 1829, when that area was the nation's westernmost frontier. Most of the Bransons had large families, and Andrew Jackson Branson was no exception. He married in 1841 and he and his wife had eleven children.

Among the children of Andrew Jackson Branson, we find several who, fascinated as their ancestors had been by the magic of the words "Go west", headed across the plains and the mountains to California, Nevada and Colorado, establishing branches of the Branson family in the far west, where they are still well represented today. In the years that A. J. Branson's children were growing up, there were other Bransons journeying to California in the fever of the Gold Rush.

Hilltop Cemetery - Archuleta Co., Colorado:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~coarchul/hilltop.htm
Branson, Andrew Jackson 1819 - 1904
Branson, Joseph A. 1872 - 1947
Branson, Matthew Brannie 1964 - 1967
Branson, Nancy Margrave 1822 - 1906

Military:
Served in the Civil War on the Union side in third Regiment, Colorado Infantry

Andrew and Nancy had the following children:

+ 83 M i Thomas Wilson BRANSON
  84 M ii William Riley BRANSON was born on 18 Mar 1844.
+ 85 M iii John Franklin BRANSON
+ 86 M iv Charles Perry BRANSON
  87 M v Andrew Jackson "Jack" BRANSON was born in 1852 in Missouri.

1880 census, La Jara And Alamos Rios, Conejos, Colorado
Jack was 28, single and a stage driver

Bureau of Land Management Records:
Patentee: ANDREW J JUNIOR BRANSON
State: COLORADO
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Issue Date: 10/1/1878
Land Office: Assigned For Automation
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
  88 M vi Benjamin Duncan BRANSON was born on 9 Dec 1869 in Missouri.

Bureau of Land Management Records:
Patentee: BENJAMIN D BRANSON
State: COLORADO
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Issue Date: 7/20/1887
Land Office: Assigned For Automation
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: May 20, 1862: Homestead EntryOriginal (12 Stat. 392)
  89 M vii Jesse BRANSON was born in 1859 in Missouri.

Bueau of Land Management Records:

Patentee: JESSE A BRANSON
State: COLORADO
Acres: 40
Metes/Bounds: No
Issue Date: 2/20/1894
Land Office: Assigned For Automation
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
+ 90 M viii Jefferson D. BRANSON
  91 M ix Daniel BRANSON was born in May 1843 in Gasconade, Missouri.
  92 M x Hiram BRANSON was born in 1848 in Missouri.

35. Elizabeth Jane MARGRAVE (Anthony , Jesse E. , John ) was born in 1829 in Missouri.

Missouri Marriage Records to 1850
Margraves, Elizabeth Jane Wallace, Elaxander 30 Mar 1848 Missouri
Osage County

Elizabeth married Alexander WALLACE on 30 Mar 1848 in Osage Co., MO. Alexander was born about 1830 in Missouri.

1850 Census - Crawford Twp, Osage, MO
Alexander Wallace, 20, MO
Elizabeth, 21, MO
Faduna, female, 1, MO

Alexander and Elizabeth had the following children:

  93 F i Faduna WALLACE was born about 1849 in Missouri.

41. John MARGRAVE (Thomas , Jesse E. , John ) was born in 1820 in Kentucky.

SOURCE:
mckenzies.net/genealogy/Snow%20HTML/D0001/I85.html

1880 US FEDERAL CENSUS - Gallatin, Illinois
John Margrave, age 59, farmer, b. KY
Abbigal, age 56, b. SC
Vina, age 14, dau, b. ILL
Marion, age 10, son, b. ILL
Dan, age 9, son, b. ILL

John married Abigail YOUNG. Abigail was born in 1823 in SC.

They had the following children:

  94 F i Roseana MARGRAVE
  95 ii Infant MARGRAVE
+ 96 M iii William D. MARGRAVE
  97 F iv Eliza I MARGRAVE
  98 M v Edmond MARGRAVE
  99 M vi Littleton B. MARGRAVE
  100 F vii Cynthia A MARGRAVE
  101 F viii Vina MARGRAVE was born about 1866 in Illinois.
  102 M ix Marion MARGRAVE was born about 1870 in Illinois.
  103 M x Dan MARGRAVE was born about 1871 in Illinois.

44. Thomas MARGRAVE (Thomas , Jesse E. , John ) was born about 1825 in Illinois.

1860 Census - Township 5 Range 7 E, Hamilton, Illinois
Thomas Margrave, 35, IL
Nancy, 22, KY
Elizabeth, 8, IL
Minerva C, 6, IL
Sarah P, 6, IL
John E, 2, IL
Celia, 3 mos, IL

1870 Census - Hamilton Co, IL
Thomas Margrave, 44
Minerva, 14.
Sarah P, 13
Edmond, 11
William 8
Celia, 10
Oled? H, 6, male
Mary J, 4,
All born IL

Thomas married Nancy. Nancy was born in Kentucky. She died prob bet 1866-1870.

Uncertain if Nancy is the mother to all of Thomas's children since she is age 22 in the 1860 census.

Thomas and Nancy had the following children:

  104 F i Elizabeth MARGRAVE was born about 1852 in Illinois.
  105 F ii Minerva MARGRAVE was born about 1856 in Illinois.
  106 F iii Sarah P. MARGRAVE was born about 1857 in Illinois.
  107 M iv Edmond MARGRAVE was born about 1859 in Illinois.
  108 F v Celia MARGRAVE was born about 1860 in Illinois.
  109 M vi William MARGRAVE was born about 1862 in Illinois.
  110 M vii Oled? H. MARGRAVE was born about 1864 in Illinois.
  111 F viii Mary J. MARGRAVE was born about 1866 in Illinois.

48. Thomas Ewing MARGRAVE (James Willis , John , John ) was born on 3 Sep 1839 in Clinton, Iowa. He died on 13 Mar 1920 in Gordon, NE.

1880 US FEDERAL CENSUS
Thos. E. MARGROVE Self M Male W 40 IA Grain Dealer KY OH
Hannah D. MARGROVE Other M Female W 37 OH Keeping House TN PA
Maggie W. MARGROVE Dau S Female W 15 NE IA OH
Geo. H. MARGROVE Son S Male W 13 KS IA OH
Jennie R. MARGROVE Dau S Female W 11 KS IA OH
Alfred W. MARGROVE Son S Male W 9 KS IA OH
Mary E. MARGROVE Dau S Female W 7 KS IA OH
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place Ashland, Saunders, Nebraska
Family History Library Film 1254755
NA Film Number T9-0755
Page Number 253A


1920 US CENSUS - Gordon, Sheridan, NE
Earl Margrave, age 37, b. KS
Thomas E, age 80, b. IA

Thomas married Hannah Dixon HENDERSON, daughter of George Dixon HENDERSON and Margaret FINDLEY. Hannah was born on 6 Feb 1843 in New Concord, Muskingum Co., Ohio. She died in Gordon, NE.

They had the following children:

  112 F i Margaret Willis MARGRAVE was born on 12 Mar 1865 in Middlebury, NE. She died on 19 Dec 1896 in Reserve, KS.
  113 M ii George Henderson MARGRAVE was born on 26 Jan 1867 in Kansas.
  114 F iii Jennie Russell MARGRAVE was born on 2 Oct 1868 in Reserve, KS. She died in 1939 in Gordon, NE.
        Jennie married Edward S. PYLE on 12 Mar 1896 in Albany, Nemaha, Kansas.
+ 115 M iv Alfred (Fred) Wade MARGRAVE
  116 F v Mary Elizabeth (Lizzie) MARGRAVE was born on 6 Jan 1872 in Kansas. She died in Aug 1937 in Gordon, NE.
  117 F vi Annie MARGRAVE was born on 8 Apr 1874 in Gordon, NE. She died on 11 Aug 1874 in Gordon, NE.

50. Charles Theodore MARGRAVE (James Willis , John , John ) was born about 1843 in Iowa.

MISSOURI CENSUS:
Name: CHARLES MARGRAVE
State: MO
County: Jasper County
Township: Jasper Township
Year: 1860
Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
Page: 921

Charles married Agnes White WHILLIANS.

They had the following children:

  118 F i Elizabeth Cecelia MARGRAVE was born on 2 Jan 1870 in Marion, Kansas. She died on 25 Apr 1941.
        Elizabeth married Clarence Eugene PARK on 25 Nov 1891 in Brown, Kansas.

51. William Addison MARGRAVE (James Willis , John , John ) was born on 1 May 1845 in Peoria, Illinois. He died on 31 Jul 1906 in Kansas.

SOURCE: Kansas State Historical Society

Died in a horse and buggy accident in 1906

Margrave Family Papers, 1861 - 1961
Microfilm reel nos.: MF 2680-MF 2683
This collection consists of the papers of the Margrave family of southeastern Nebraska and northeastern Kansas. The Margraves, a family of Sac and Fox Indian extraction, owned a great deal of land, which they used for cattle ranching. Most of the papers in this collection consist of business papers in connection with the Margrave's cattle ranching business, such as real estate papers, property tax receipts, account ledgers, stock certificates, and minutes of meetings of the board of directors. Other papers concern government relations with the Sac and Fox Indians, financial contributions to Baker University and the estates of William Addison Margrave and William Charles Margrave.

The Kansas State Historical Society also has photographic reproductions of 52 photos of the Margraves. The originals are in the hands of Suzanne Heck, who loaned the collection to the Kansas State Historical Society.

When William Addison Margrave befell a horse and buggy accident on July 31, 1906, he died intestate, meaning, he died without a will. Series 2 contains the court transcripts of the Richardson County (Nebraska) District Court, which determined the allocation of the Margrave property. Oddly enough, the District Court did not issue a decree on the fate of the estate until 1919, thirteen years after Margrave's death. One of the most significant features of the six transcripts in this series is that they give a complete legal description of all of the parcels of the Margrave property.

There are six transcripts on the Margrave property because the family owned property in five different counties.

These five court decrees, plus a petition for the determination of heirship for a total of six sets of transcripts.

Series 3: Irvin Memorial Chapel, dedication bulletin, 1916 March 12.

One of the buildings on Margrave property was a Methodist Episcopal Church, which they had built in 1916. Series 4 is a photocopy of the bulletin for the dedication service of the church at Margrave's ranch, on March 12, 1916. This chapel was named after Rev. Samuel Irwin, one of the first missionaries to the region.

Series 4: Last Will and Testament of William C. Margrave, 1923 August 24.

Documents such as wills are revealing in that they show what people owned, valued, and how they really felt about their family members. Not surprisingly, W. C. Margrave allotted a third of his estate to his second wife, Ida, and the remaining two thirds to his six children, following the settlement of his debts. He also intended that his heirs continue raising livestock, if they possibly could.

William married Margaret RUBETI, daughter of Wah-se-con, a Sac and Fox Indian and Jean RUBETI.

SOURCE: Kansas State Historical Society
Margaret's father was Wah-se-con, a Sac and Fox Indian
her mother, Jean Rubeti, a French Canadian who lived near the Sac and Fox Reservation

William and Margaret had the following children:

  119 F i Julia MARGRAVE
  120 F ii Margaret Lunette MARGRAVE died Died at Birth.
+ 121 M iii William Charles MARGRAVE
+ 122 M iv James Thomas MARGRAVE
  123 M v Earl Irvin MARGRAVE was born Jan or Feb 1883 in Sauk & Fox, Great Nemahaw, Reserve, Brown, Kansas.
        Earl married Pearl Edith IRELAND.

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