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William HUNT

Notes

134. Phebe Ann HOCKETT

Notes for PHEBE ANN HOCKETT:
Phebe was the second settler in York township, Tama Co., IA, and took up squatters claim on Section 23, where she lived a few years and moved on to Oneida. She died in Iowa Co. a few years later. According to census records, she was living with her son William in 1860.

Old settlers of York township tell of a strange animal seen in the early days. It was called a white lion. At one time, when Mrs. Fowler, an early settler, was away from home, the beast came near the house. Mrs. Fowler took an ax and was going to brain the brute but her courage left her, she fled into the house, piling table and chairs against the door to keep the terrible lion out. Finally it disappeared all together.

189. Nathan H HOCKETT

Notes for NATHAN H. HOCKETT:
Nathan "...started to move from Henry Co., Iowa, to Oregon in 1847. He reached the Rocky Mountains, where he died, Aug. 20th. His wife Rebecca died nine days afterwards, 100 miles distance on the route. Nathan's four children were taken on to Oregon. Two afterwards returned to Iowa; the other two remained in Oregon."

Rebecca MILLS

Notes for NATHAN H. HOCKETT:
Nathan "...started to move from Henry Co., Iowa, to Oregon in 1847. He reached the Rocky Mountains, where he died, Aug. 20th. His wife Rebecca died nine days afterwards, 100 miles distance on the route. Nathan's four children were taken on to Oregon. Two afterwards returned to Iowa; the other two remained in Oregon."

199. William S. HOCKETT

SOURCE: FAMILY TREEMAKER HOME PAGE
http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/m/i/s/Stacia-Misner/BOOK-0001/0015-0004.html

NOTES:
William "... owns 94 acres of land, which his father entered and deeded to his son, who has since improved it and has the first improved farm in this locality....Republican."

Matilda FOWLER

Notes for MATILDA FOWLER:
Matilda "...has had a very eventful life. Having married at the age of 14, and the following May she and her husband and a good many other families started across the 'plains' as it was then called, for California. There were fifty-six ox teams composing the 'train.' They arrived in California just before Christmas. Her first child was born, died and buried somewhere east of the Rocky mountains. Her story of their hardships on the road, their dread of savage Indians, who were always watching them, and of her life in wild, lawless California from 1850 to 1860 is more like romance than reality. Her husband was a veteran of the civil war and died soon after his discharge.

They found no gold in California after some ten years there they joined a wagon train of 40 wagons and started their journey east. The Fowlers came to Farnhamville with their families in the large covered wagon and stayed here. The wagon was parked in the alley back of the now Russell Gray home - 440 - Hardin where it stood for many years until it rotted away."