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David GLENDENNING

Notes

2. Mary GLENDENNING

"A romantic tradition, perhaps fiction, says she was kidnapped by sailors, taken to America, and sold as a servant girl." "At the beginning of hostilities between Scotland and England, she was captured by a band of English sailors, transported immediately to America and sold to some settlers for a servant girl..."

The first record burial at Springfield [NC] was that of Mary Hoggatt...knowing the end near, she said to husband, who was then 93, 'Philip, our sons and daughters have moved into a new territory than the limits of Deep River Meeting. They have found homes near the field of Springs, and their children and their descendants for many generations to come will live and worship. I have never been afraid of the wilderness. I have followed thee from Scotland to Pennsylvania, thence to Virginia and North Carolina. I have never known fear in my life and I certainly shall not in death. When my body is put away, I shall like for it to be carried to Springfield and buried in the forest there, so that I may be near the meeting house and homes which our children have established. If I am buried there others will soon follow, so even as in life, let me in death be a pioneer."

Phillip HOGGATT

Notes for PHILLIP HOGGATT:
Phillip and Mary were a Quaker couple who came to William Penn's colony in Chester County, PA in early 1700s. They moved to Virginia with 7 children.

Phillip is mentioned in 1750 as member of Camp Creek MM, Louisa Co.,VA; mentioned in 1753 as member of Cedar Creek MM, Hanover Co.,VA; mentioned in 1756 as member of New Garden MM, Rowan Co.,NC.

Phillip Hoggatt's log home in NC was built in 1754. It was originally on the south end of High Point, NC - South Main Street Extension - now stands at High Point Museum and is now named the Weaving House It is the oldest building in High Point. It was moved to its new location in 1973 where it was restored and opened to the public.

Phillip and Mary were buried in a nearby Quaker cemetery. Many of their descendants left North Carolina at the end of the 18th century to venture into Louisiana Purchase territory.